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Dance MFA Handbook 2017-18

Department of Dance

Master of Fine Arts in Dance

Student Handbook 2017-18


 

Table of Contents

Department of Dance Faculty and Staff Listing

Department of Dance Mission Statement

NASD Accreditation

Dance Student Assembly Mission Statement

Individual Advisors & Graduate Director

Department of Dance Code of Ethics

Rackham Graduate Student Policies

SMTD Academic Integrity & Code of Ethics

Dress Code for Studio Courses

Attendance and Other Policies

Department of Dance Attendance Policy

School of Music, Theatre, & Dance Attendance and Absence Policy

Department of Dance Injury/Illness Policy

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Commitment

Sexual Misconduct Policy

Religious Holidays

University-related Absence

Unexcused Absences Pertaining to Dance Technique Courses

Expectations of MFA Dance Candidates

Graduate Student Instructors

GSI - Canceled Class Policy

GSI - Injuries/Illnesses Within Courses the GSI is Teaching

Course Schedule & Registration

Drop/Add

Late Add/Drop

Degree Audits

Auditing a Course

Transfer Credit

Variations in Credit/Course Planning

Faculty Indi Numbers

Grading Policy

Letters of Recommendation

MFA Course Listing - Sequences

MFA Course Listing – Individual Courses

Curriculum Notes

Credit for Paid Activities

Repertory Credit

Ann Arbor Dance Works

Paul Taylor Summer Intensive

Independent Study

Field Experience

Cognates

Course Descriptions

MFA Thesis Process & Guidelines

Thesis Protocols & Timelines

Applying for Graduation & Deadlines

Production Policies & Performances

MFA Thesis Concert Protocols

MFA Thesis Performances – Betty Pease Studio Theater

MFA Thesis Performances – Off-site

Thesis Performance Protocol

Required MFA Thesis Project Timeline

Publicity Materials

Poster Design

Program Design

Digital Thesis Project Portfolio Guidelines

Digital Thesis Project Portfolio Components

Thesis Hard Copy Component

MFA Graduation Checklist

Archiving the Thesis Project Portfolio

Details Regarding the Digital Thesis Project Portfolio Components

Communicating with the Thesis Chair

Digital Thesis Project Portfolio - Example

Additional Curriculum Notes

Career Portfolio

Career Portfolio Timeline

Entrepreneurial Skills and Career Strategies

Preparing Future Faculty

CRLT Graduate Teaching Certificate

Crew Work for Department of Dance Productions

Rehearsal Space

Outside Performances

Student Activities & Awards

DSA Representative

American College Dance Association (ACDA)

Emerging Dance Artists Concert

SMTD Collage Concert

General Information & Resources

Graduate Student Services and Support

Dean of Students Office

CRLT – Center for Research on Learning and Teaching

Rackham Emergency Funds

Graduate Student Funding

Grant Sources at the University of Michigan

Complimentary Ticket Policy

GEO

Department of Dance Office

Security

Locker Space

Basic Building Information

Student Lounge at Dance Building

Communications Room

Performance Lab

Kitchen at Geddes

Resource Room at Geddes

Health & Wellness

Campus Services

Central Campus Recreation Building Facilities

Sweetland Center for Writing

EXCEL

The Career Center

M-Compass, International Study Opportuities

Center for Global and Intercultural Study (CGIS)

Counseling & Psychological Services

Nutrition Clinic

M-Perform Performance Arts Therapy

MedSport

Transportation

University Health Service (UHS)

U-Move Fitness


Appendices

Appendix A: Advising Checklist for Graduates Completing an MFA

Appendix B: MFA Graduation Checklist

Appendix C: Thesis Committee Guidelines

Appendix D: General Standards

Appendix E: MedSport Flowchart

Appendix F: Illness and Injury Policy

Appendix G: Recovery Plan of Action Form



Department of Dance Faculty and Staff

2017-2018

Name

Uniqname

Indi Number

Chair

Jessica Fogel, Professor

jkfogel

611

Staff

Katie Gunning (Dance), Administrative Coordinator

kgunning

--

Sean Hoskins, Dance Technology Coordinator & Production Assistant

hoskinss

--

Faculty

Missy Beck, Lecturer II

mlbeck

601

Amy Chavasse, Associate Professor

chavasse

608

Mary Cole, Lecturer IV

mcole

036

Amy Cova, Lecturer

acova

--

Clare Croft, Assistant Professor

chcroft

619

Bill DeYoung, Professor

bdyj

615

Beth Genné, Professor (on leave F17-W18)

genne

612

Jennifer Harge, Lecturer

jharge

--

Jillian Hopper, Lecturer I

jhopper

--

Sean Hoskins, Lecturer

hoskinss

--

Angela Jamison, Lecturer

angelasj

002

Slavka Jelinkova, Lecturer I

slavka

--

Angela Kane, Professor

atkane

603

Tzveta Kassabova, Assistant Professor

tzveta

--

Christian Matijas Mecca, Associate Professor

xmecca

607

Judy Rice, Associate Professor

jrrice

602

Stephen Rush, Professor of Music (Dance/Music Technology)

srush

115

Biza Sompa, Lecturer II

bizajb

604

Peter Sparling, Professor

petespar

614

Sandra Torijano, Associate Professor

torid

609

Amy West, Lecturer II

alwest

--

Khita Whyatt, Lecturer II

khitaw

200

Robin Wilson, Associate Professor

robinwil

118


 


Department of Dance Mission Statement
The University of Michigan’s Department of Dance is committed to excellence, innovation, learning in action, and interdisciplinary inquiry. We encourage students to explore the University’s breadth of resources, bridging knowledge across disciplines and communities to gain an understanding of dance as a significant mode of inquiry. Our internationally renowned faculty provides a range of perspectives that integrate practice and theory, with the goal of preparing dance artists for resilient and multi-faceted careers in a rapidly evolving field. We are committed to an inclusive learning environment that encourages deep engagement through the transformative experiences of dancing and dance making. We celebrate risk taking, engaged learning, and entrepreneurship. Our aim is for students to forge their own creative voice, consolidate a range of technical skills, develop strong collaborative skills, participate in extensive performances opportunities, and gain an understanding of the relevance of dance within culture. 

 

NASD Accreditation

The University of Michigan Department of Dance has been an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Dance (NASD) since 2006. Students may access NASD’s website: nasd.arts-accredit.org.

Dance Student Assembly Mission Statement

The Dance Student Assembly (DSA) is the official student government in the Department of Dance at the University of Michigan. In addition to its officers (President, Vice President, Treasurer), each year group in the BFA has at least one representative and the MFA cohort is represented by at least one student. The DSA is committed to building an environment that represents undergraduate and graduate student interests, concerns, and issues that relate to policies within the Department of Dance. Members report to and collaborate with the Chair of the Department on a regular basis, allowing the DSA to act as a liaison between students and the faculty. This relationship assists in shaping policy that responds to and reflects student needs. Moreover, the DSA organizes student activities, keeps students informed of Department events, provides an open forum for students to voice opinions, and strives to incorporate other departments in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. The DSA encourages active participation in the Department of Dance, student and faculty projects, and provides a nourishing, learning environment for all.

Further information about serving on DSA.

Individual Advisors & Graduate Director

Each graduate student is appointed an individual advisor from among the full-time faculty. The individual advisor meets periodically with his or her advisee to provide guidance on the successful completion of the degree and professional development. Students are responsible for making appointments with his/her individual advisors to discuss aspects of the program and progress towards the degree. The individual advisor should be a first point of contact and is a resource for curricular policies and procedures.

The Graduate Director can provide an overview of the MFA program as a whole. The Graduate Director is the main point of contact with the Rackham Graduate School and will also meet regularly with all Graduate Students throughout the year as a component of the Dance Student Association to discuss interests, concerns and issues as they apply to graduate studies in Dance.

Department of Dance Code of Ethics

The Department of Dance strives to sustain a lively community of artists/scholars who value self-expression, independent thinking, and a diversity of creative responses to their academic and professional endeavors. This dynamic environment brings with it the responsibilities for mutual respect and a code of ethics. Policies for attendance, dress code, grading, evaluation and student/faculty interaction are outlined herein. Dance Student Assembly (DSA) acts as a liaison with faculty and the Chair to address issues and grievances, and as an important means of communication back to the student body.

Rackham Graduate Student Policies

The Rackham Handbook lists its Graduate student policies including: Academic Code of Conduct; Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy; Non-Academic Conduct; and Dispute Resolution Policy and Procedures. Further information about resolving disputes on the Rackham website

In congruence with these policies, the department asks of its faculty and students that they participate actively in building and maintaining a community with equal opportunity and responsibility for all, celebrating difference and the particular demands of the artistic pursuit on uniquely individual human beings.

SMTD Academic Integrity & Code of Ethics

SMTD prohibits all forms of academic dishonesty and misconduct, including cheating, plagiarism, or otherwise representing the work of others as one’s own. All cases of academic misconduct will be referred to the appropriate Associate Dean. Being found responsible for academic misconduct will result in a grade sanction or even failure of a course, and could result in academic probation or dismissal from the university. Policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. It is each and every student’s responsibility to be familiar with University rules and guidelines on academic integrity. The Department also follows the SMTD Code of Ethics. See SMTD Handbook for complete Code of Ethics and Academic Code of Conduct.

Dress Code for Studio Courses

All students are expected to follow the directions of their individual instructor regarding appropriate and acceptable wear in class. In general, it is expected that students dress for technique classes so that the instructor is able to clearly see—without obstruction—the body at work: its articulations, alignment, points of movement initiation, and paths of completion

 

Attendance and Other Policies

Department of Dance Attendance Policy

Students are expected to attend all scheduled class sessions within each course. It is also expected that students will take as much advantage as possible of master classes, guest lectures, Department forums, guest residencies, and other special events that may occur both within courses and outside the auspices of a particular course. Since courses in the Department have a variety of structures, instructors in the first week of class will indicate in writing the specific attendance/participation requirements for each course. When the instructor considers the number of late arrivals, early departures, and/or absences excessive, and when a student’s absence from a course endangers his/her satisfactory academic progress and/or the work of other students, the instructor may submit a written report at mid-term to the student’s advisor, the Department’s Graduate Director, the Department chair, and the office of the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. In no case can a student expect to earn a passing grade without consistent attendance and class participation.

Excused absences include absences on the part of pre-approved University or Departmental functions, absences due to illness or that are accompanied by a physician’s note, and absences for religious holidays (see below for more details). Students are required to notify faculty in advance of these excused absences. Email the professor promptly, in as much advance of an absence as possible. If a student must be absent, it is his/her responsibility to be prepared to execute or discuss any material missed.

School of Music, Theatre, & Dance Attendance and Absence Policy

Students should account for absences to their instructors and advisor when appropriate and may expect unexcused absences to be reflected in their final grade. Those who have been absent from any one course for more than three consecutive weeks will not receive credit for the course unless permission to continue is granted by the instructor and the Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs. Students who are absent from all courses for more than three consecutive weeks may be required to withdraw from the School for the rest of the term. Application for permission to continue enrollment must be made to the Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs.

Department of Dance Injury/Illness policy

It is mandatory for students to communicate with teachers in the case of injury or illness if it impacts the student’s participation in a class. Absences due to illness or injury with a note from a health care professional are considered excused absences. Teachers strive to support students in their recovery. When absent, please notify the teacher, if at all possible, prior to the class. A student’s failure to communicate with teachers about absences will result in the student’s absences being unexcused. If a student feels ill or becomes injured during a class, please inform the teacher. Appendix F contains the entire Injury/Illness policy, including how to fill out a Recovery Plan of Action Form (Appendix G) with the instructor. Please refer to these documents for more in-depth information and policies regarding injury and illness.

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

If a student thinks they need an accommodation for a disability, they should let the instructor know at their earliest convenience. Some aspects of the course, the assignments, the in-class activities, and the way the course is usually taught may be modified to facilitate the student’s participation and progress. As soon as the student makes the instructor aware of their needs, they can work with U-M’s Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) office (G664 Haven Hall, Central Campus) to help determine appropriate academic accommodations. SSD (734-763-3000; email at ssdoffice@umich.edu; http://ssd.umich.edu) typically recommends accommodations through a Verified Individualized Services and Accommodations (VISA) form. The student must present their SSD-approved VISA form to the instructor no later than two weeks prior to the need for an accommodation. The purpose of these accommodations is to provide all students with an equitable and fair opportunity to learn, grow, and demonstrate mastery of course content. Accommodations will not alter the fundamental integrity of a course. Any information the student provides is private and confidential and will be treated as such. Contact the Associate Dean’s office for assistance in accessing learning accommodations.

More https://ssd.umich.edu/article/syllabus-statement for more ideas.

 

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Commitment

SMTD is committed to the ideal of inclusion as a core academic and artistic pillar. We construe inclusivity in the broadest possible terms and aspire to promote an inclusive and fully representative learning environment with respect to race, ethnicity, social class, sexuality, religion, gender, and ability, and also diversity of thought, experience, and outlook upon the world. SMTD’s strategic DEI plan can be found at http://www.music.umich.edu/about/diversity-equity-inclusion.htm. Contact Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Freyja Harris via email freyharr@umich.edu, phone (734) 764-3757, or drop-in at Moore 2313, with suggestions, questions, or concerns.

See U-M’s Non-Discrimination Policy

 

Sexual Misconduct Policy

The SMTD community understands that sexual violence can undermine academic success and we encourage anyone dealing with sexual misconduct to talk to someone about their experience. Confidential support and academic advocacy are immediately available through U-M’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center (SAPAC) on their 24-hour crisis line at (734) 936-3333 and at sapac.umich.edu. Alleged violations can be non-confidentially reported to U-M’s Office for Institutional Equity (OIE) via email at institutional.equity@umich.edu or by phone at (734) 763-0235. SMTD has an on-site counselor—Emily Hyssong (LMSW)—assigned from the university’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Email her at emhyss@umich.edu for an appointment. CAPS services are always free and confidential.

See CRLT’s Sexual Assault Awareness page for more information.

Religious Holidays

It is the policy of the University of Michigan to make every reasonable effort to allow members of the University community to observe their religious holidays without academic penalty. Absence from classes or examinations for religious reasons does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the course work required during the period of absence. Students who expect to miss classes, examinations, or other assignments as a consequence of their religious observance shall be provided with a reasonable alternative opportunity to complete such academic responsibilities. It is the obligation of students to provide faculty with reasonable notice of the dates of religious holidays on which they will be absent. Such notice must be given by the drop/add deadline of the given term. Students who are absent on days of examinations or class assignments shall be offered an opportunity to make up the work, without penalty, unless it can be demonstrated that a make-up opportunity would interfere unreasonably with the delivery of the course. Should disagreement arise over any aspect of this policy, the parties involved should contact the Department Chair, the Dean of the School, or the Ombudsperson. Final appeals will be resolved by the Provost.

University-related Absence

When absent from class on behalf of the University of Michigan, it is the expectation that the student will make alternative arrangements for fulfilling class assignments. The alternative arrangement should not unduly inconvenience either faculty members or other students. It is the student’s obligation, if s/he expects to miss classes, examinations, or other assignments as a consequence of representing the University, to provide his/her individual advisor with reasonable notice for dates of anticipated absences and to work with course instructors to obtain assignments, so as to prepare the necessary academic material. Additionally, it is the student’s responsibility to find out what took place in the missed class/es. Be prepared to execute or discuss any material missed.

Unexcused Absences Pertaining to Dance Technique Courses

In a technique class that meets twice a week during the fall or winter terms, unexcused absences above two will result in an automatic 1/3 drop in the student’s final grade with each additional absence. In a technique class that meets once a week during the fall or winter terms, unexcused absences above one will result in an automatic 1/3 drop in the student’s final grade with each additional absence. Spring term courses may have other policies, depending upon the number of classes per week, and the duration of each class session.


Expectations of MFA dance candidates

In addition to policies stated elsewhere in this handbook, Dance MFA’s are expected to:

  • Assist/lead in the late August/early September new MFA orientation.
  • Assist as needed during all BFA and MFA auditions.
  • Be an example to the undergrads (both BFA Dance and non-major students).
  • Document progress through the program in coordination with the individual advisor using the Advisor/Advisee Checklist (See Appendix A for sample forms).
  • Work closely with the individual advisor on program requirements, pathways and career plans.
  • Assist/lead feedback sessions at the BFA WIPs.
  • Regularly check and use the UMICH email for all Department communications and practice good email etiquette.
  • Regularly check the Department’s Google calendar to keep up to date with Department events.
  • Attend Friends of Dance event(s).
  • Attend all Department forums. Attendance will be taken.
  • Attend all BFA and MFA Works-in-Progress.
  • Attend all Research in Action colloquiums.
  • Email the Dance faculty and Grads in the event of a necessary absence from a required event, explaining the absence.

Graduate Student Instructors

Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs) have a significant responsibility as teachers of non-major Dance courses within the Department. These courses provide graduate students with the opportunity to deepen their proficiency as teachers, develop their teaching philosophies, develop new courses, and convey their passion for the field to their students. GSI teaching will be assigned and mentored by Dance faculty.

GSIs are also encouraged to draw upon the resources of the Center for Research in Learning and Teaching (CRLT), which provides workshops and guidance for a variety of teaching issues. For more information, please visit: crlt.umich.edu/index.php. CRLT also produces a GSI guidebook that can be accessed online: crlt.umich.edu/gsis/gsi_guide.php.

GSI - Cancelled Class Policy

In the event that a GSI is unable to teach a class due to illness, they should report this ASAP to the Department Administrator and the Graduate Director (kgunning@umich.edu, chavasse@umich.edu.) The Department will make every reasonable effort to hold the class – given the size of classes for non-Dance majors, a make-up session is hard to schedule – and may ask the student to help identify a substitute. If unable to identify a substitute or another non-major class that the students can join, the GSI should email the students immediately informing them of the cancellation and assign an outside assignment to make up for the loss of class time.

GSI - Injuries/Illnesses Within Courses the GSI is Teaching

Please carefully review and follow the Department of Dance Injury/Illness policy guidelines and procedures found in Appendix F.  Please note that an Injury Report must be filed within 24 hours with the Department administrator. Follow up on injuries promptly, assisting the student(s) with seeking treatment at the University’s Health Center, MedSport, or with other healthcare professionals. Injury Report form

 

Course Schedule & Registration

For information, including forms, refer to the Student Resources section of the SMTD website.

Registration Process

• Advisor. All students must see their individual advisor before registering for courses. S/he will help the student plan a class schedule based on degree requirements and personal goals. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate transfer of credits, to follow up on changes in the program, and to keep his/her advising record up-to-date by filling out the appropriate “Advisor/Advisee” form, thereby monitoring fulfillment of curriculum requirements. Advisor/Advisee forms are available on the Department of Dance website and are included in the MFA handbook (Appendix A).  This is a critical tool to help the student and the individual advisor navigate course choices and enables the student to track his/her progress through the program as well as form part of the student’s record.

• Schedule of Classes. The schedule of classes is online and can be viewed through Wolverine Access. The schedule is divided by term, then by School, then by Department.

• Overrides. An override is needed to elect all Dance MFA courses. Students should email the Department Administrator (kgunning@umich.edu) and cc their advisor to request an override. Please include the Dance class number (ex: Dance 511.001, Dance 601.001, etc.) and student’s UMID number in the email request.

• Registration. Once the overrides have been entered, students will receive an email indicating their ability to register via Wolverine Access.

Drop/Add

If the student is registered for a course s/he does not intend to take, the student should drop it. The student is not automatically dropped from a class roster for non-attendance. Through the third week of classes in a full term (or the second week of classes in a half term), students may use Wolverine Access to add or drop a course, change status from credit to visit (audit), or increase or decrease the hours for a course within the range listed in the Time Schedule. The Registrar’s Office publisheseach year’s Drop/Add deadlineon its website. Graduate program approval is necessary to change course elections. Certain graduate programs may have additional deadlines or procedures. (See Rackham 2017-2018 Student Handbook)


Late Add/Drop

After the third week in a full term (or the second week in a half term), and until the last day of classes of that term or half term, students must request a late drop or add via Wolverine Access. Any course for which a drop is registered after the third week in a full term (or the second week in a half term) will appear on the permanent record as “W” (section 4.5). For any other change of status (credit to visit, etc.) to a course during the term, a student must obtain signed approval from the course instructor and the chair of their graduate program on an election worksheet which is then submitted to the Registrar’s Office before the last day of classes. Students should contact the graduate program administrator for election worksheets or contact the Registrar’s Office at 1210 LSA Building, 500 S. State St.

Degree Audits

All students should meet with their individual advisor each term to ensure that credits are well distributed across the four terms of MFA study, and that track, Dance elective, cognate, and required course choices meet program requirements. An audit should occur at the end of Year 1.

Auditing a Course

From the Rackham Graduate School Academic Policies, Section 4 entitled, "Coursework, Grading and Academic Standing":

With permission of the advisor and the course instructor, a student may enroll in a course as a visitor (auditor) rather than for credit. A notation of “VI” appears on the transcript when the course is completed successfully (section 4.5). After a grade has been issued, a course may not be changed from letter grade to visit (audit) status, or vice versa. A visit (audit) will not be counted toward degree credit requirements.

Full fees will be assessed at the current rate of tuition. After registering for the course online via Wolverine Access, the student must register for this status in person at the Registrar’s Office and present a Drop/Add form with the signatures of both the instructor and the student’s department graduate chair or advisor. Before enrolling, the student must confer with the instructor to reach an agreement on what will constitute satisfactory completion of the course. The student is expected to attend class regularly and may be asked to submit assignments and take examinations. Elections of visited (audited) courses must appear on the class schedule printout provided at registration. Students should check their class schedule printouts for accuracy and completeness.

Transfer Credit

All non-UM schools or programs attended must send an official transcript to the Rackham Graduate School and all requests for transfer of credit must be approved by the student’s program and by Rackham OARD. It is the student’s responsibility to find out which credits are transferable. *NOTE: In most cases, Dance curricular requirements cannot be substituted with coursework done at other institutions or summer workshops.

Variations in Credit/Course Planning

• The published requirements for graduation are minimum requirements for completion of the MFA program. Additional credit may be taken in any area of interest. This credit is then counted towards graduation as elective credit.

• MFA students who wish to enroll for fewer than 9 credit hours or more than 18 credit hours for the full term (4-6 for the half-term) must obtain the permission of the individual advisor and the Dean of Graduate Studies at the School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

• Under special circumstances, students may be able to use the Course Waiver or Substitution form to substitute one course for another required course, or to waive a course. To fill out a course waiver/substitution form, the student needs to contact the SMTD Advising and School Registrar’s office: Deedee Ulintz: dianals@umich.edu, 734-764-0592 or Tom Erickson: tericks@umich.edu, 734-764-8623. The student should let Deedee or Tom know what the course waiver/substitution is for and who their advisor is. Deedee or Tom will then send them the form via Signnow. If approval is granted, the request will be forwarded to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Associate Dean for Graduate Studies.

Faculty Indi Numbers

Most faculty members have an ‘indi number’, which enables students to register for an Independent Study or Field Experience course under the direction of the faculty member. Please refer to the front of this handbook for a listing of faculty indi numbers or the Department Administrator for more information. (See Independent Study in the Dance Curriculum Notes section of this handbook for more information.)

 

Grading Policy

The Rackham Graduate School has established the following descriptions and criteria for grading at the graduate level:

Excellent: Markedly above average for graduate students

A+

(4.3 points)

The highest conceivable standard of work

A

(4.0 points)

Genuinely outstanding

A-

(3.7 points)

A very high standard in which strengths far exceed weaknesses

Good: Standard normally expected of graduate students

B+

(3.3 points)

Above average

B

(3.0 points)

Average

B-

(2.7 points)

Revealing certain weaknesses

Fair: Below average for graduate students

C+

(2.3 points)

Lacking essential qualities

C

(2.0 points)

Marginally acceptable

C-

(1.7 points)

Need for marked improvement to remain in program

Poor: Not acceptable at graduate level

D+

(1.3 points)

D

(1.0 points)

D-

(0.7 points)

 

These numbers are used to calculate Michigan Honor Points (MHP) and the Grade Point Average (GPA). Michigan Honor Points (MHP) are calculated by multiplying the number of credit hours for which the course was elected by the number of points earned on the grading scale. The grade-point average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the Michigan Honor Points earned for a term or more by the number of credit hours for the courses. A cumulative GPA of B (3.0) or higher is required to remain in good standing or to receive a degree. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below B (3.0) is placed on academic probation for the following term (or half-term) of enrollment. A student whose cumulative grade-point average falls below B for two or more terms may be required to withdraw. No course in which a grade of D, E, I, W (Drop), VI (Visit), ED (Unofficial Drop), U (Unsatisfactory) or Y (work still in progress in a multi-term course) is received may be counted to satisfy any requirement.

A student may receive a grade of Incomplete (“I”) only if the coursework remaining to be done by the end of the semester is small and the instructor approves an extension for completing the unfinished work. The instructor must agree to this arrangement and determine a deadline for finishing the assigned work before a grade is assigned. The notation of “I” remains a permanent part of the academic record. When coursework is completed to the satisfaction of the instructor, the grade will appear on the transcript as, for example, “I B+.” The grade point average is based only on hours of coursework completed.

*Avoid incomplete grades*

Even when course work is completed, an "Incomplete" remains on the transcript and becomes a significant negative factor when the student is under consideration for a fellowship or employment. An Incomplete that is not made up represents an even more serious blemish.

A student who submits work to make up an Incomplete when the deadline is imminent should point out the approaching deadline to the faculty member and stress the urgency of reporting the grade prior to the deadline. A student who waits until the last minute to make up an Incomplete may find that, for unanticipated reasons, the faculty member is simply unable to do so before the deadline. Sometimes illness intervenes. Sometimes s/he is unavailable, or has left the University. In some cases, an Incomplete ultimately means that the student must elect another course.

Letters of Recommendation

If requesting a letter of recommendation from a faculty member, the student must provide the following information:

  • Plan ahead. Allow a month's notice if possible, at a minimum. Send a polite reminder to the faculty member two weeks before the letter is due. Follow up to see if the letter has been sent and thank them for their time and willingness. If called for an interview, offered the position and/or accept/ reject, let the faculty member know. Faculty put a lot of time and energy into helping the student succeed.
  • Complete address and contact information, including the name of the person to whom the letter will be addressed. If there is no name, specify that the letter can be addressed “To Whom It May Concern.”
  • Date the recommendation is due and whether it must be received or postmarked by that date, and whether it is a physical copy or an online submission.
  • Copy or website link of the job description, summer program, internship, etc.
  • Website links to the organization, school and/or person to whom applying. If one cannot have access to these, provide some context and background for the nature of the job, position or internship.
  • Reasons why applying and, if the student has a letter of interest or cover letter, please share with the faculty member. It is helpful in crafting a customized letter for the student. The more details faculty have the better. If there is a compelling reason this is the ideal course or position, articulate this clearly to the faculty member.
  • Current resume and, where appropriate, copies of a teaching and/or research statement, and copy of the student’s cover letter.
  • Stamped and addressed envelope for the faculty member to use or details of electronic submission requirements. If asking for multiple letters, provide adequate stamped and addressed envelopes.

 

The Career Center can provide additional support in developing the student’s portfolio.

 

MFA Course Listings - Sequences

RESEARCH IN ACTION

10 credits

This 10-credit sequence of courses is required for all MFA dance students.

TRACK  

20 credits

MFA students choose ONE of the following tracks:

Performance/Repertory

Choreography

                                                          

Screendance

                                

DANCE ELECTIVES

10-14 credits

MFA students choose courses in one or more of the following areas as dance electives. Courses from either/both of their non-specialist tracks may also function as dance electives.

Dance Science

Dance History

Dance Education

COGNATES

6-10 credits

Cognates to comprise at least two graduate-level courses of at least three credit hours each.

THESIS

10 credits

This comprises three components: Thesis preparation, production and reflection.

This 10-credit sequence of courses is required for all MFA students.


MFA Course Listings– Individual Courses

NOTE: Not all courses are offered all terms/years.

RESEARCH IN ACTION

10 credits

501

RIA 1: Research Methods in Dance

3 credits

502

RIA 2: Problematizing Theory in Practice

3 credits

505

RIA 3: Self-Evaluation Report

1 credit

601

RIA 4: Dance History & Theory

3 credits

TRACK

20 credits

NOTE: All three tracks will include core courses toward track credits consisting of Dance 534 Performance Improvisation I (3 credits); Dance 531/524 Solo Composition or Solo Performance (3 credits)*; Dance 532 Choreography, Performance, Production & Design (3 credits); and Dance 631 Graduate Studio (2 credits).

Performance/Repertory

521

University Dance Company

1 credit

621

University Dance Company

1-2 credits

525/625

Ann Arbor Dance Works Repertory

1 credit each

526/626

Paul Taylor Summer Intensive Repertory

1 credit each

527/627

Special Topics: Performance/Repertory

1-3 credits each

528/628

Field Experience: Performance/Repertory

1-3 credits each

529/629

Independent Study: Performance/Repertory

1-3 credits each

Choreography

534

Performance of Improvisation 1

3 credits

535

Mapping Movement & Place: Site Dance Composition

3 credits

536

Dramaturgy for Physical Performance

3 credits

634

Performance Improvisation 2

3 credits

538/638

Field Experience: Choreography

1-3 credits each

539/639

Independent Study: Choreography

1-3 credits each

583

Dance & Related Arts

2 credits

*If Performance/Repertory track, enroll in Dance 524. If Choreography track, enroll in Dance 531.

Screendance

542

Screendance 1: Collaborations in New Media

3 credits

543/643

Screendance Portfolio

2-4 credits

642

Screendance 2: Advanced Projects & Productions

3 credits

548/648

Field Experience: Screendance

1-3 credits each

549/649

Independent Study: Screendance

1-3 credits each

**In consultation with an individual advisor, Screendance track MFA’s may choose additional courses from Penny Stamps School of Art and Design &/or Screen Arts and Culture. A list of current courses from those schools will be supplied to those in the Screendance track.

DANCE ELECTIVES

10-14 credits

Dance Science

551

Experiential Anatomy

3 credits

(rarely offered)

558/658

Field Experience: Dance Science

1-3 credits each

559/659

Independent Study: Dance Science

1-3 credits each

Dance History

546

Dancing Women/Dancing Queer

3 credits

562

Reading & Writing Dance Criticism

3 credits

563

Dancing Diasporas (rarely offered)

3 credits

564

George Balanchine & the Transformation of American Dance (not offered 2017/18)

3 credits

661

Reading & Writing Dance History

3 credits

567/667

Special Topics: Dance History

1-3 credits each

568/668

Field Experience: Dance History

1-3 credits each

569/669

Independent Study: Dance History

1-3 credits each

Dance Education

571

Pedagogy: Dance Technique

3 credits

572

Pedagogy: Dance Composition

3 credits

575

Pedagogy: Dance History

3 credits

578/678

Field Experience: Dance Education

1-3 credits each

579/679

Independent Study: Dance Education

1-3 credits each

Additional Electives

586

Accompanying Movement

3 credits

DANCE TECHNIQUE / PHYSICAL PRACTICE

Students are required to take a minimum of 8 credits of dance technique/physical practice over the course of their degree. These credits can be applied either toward track credits or dance elective credit. Credits in dance techniques and physical practice can be taken in a variety of genres, including modern, ballet, some Friday labs, and Performance of Improvisation. There are also independent study options for dance techniques and physical practice. When enrolled in the 3-credit course Performance of Improvisation 1 (534), one of the three credits may be applied toward the 8-credit dance technique/physical practice requirement; the same applies if a student elects to take Performance of Improvisation 2 (634): one of the three credits may be applied toward the 8-credit dance techniques/physical practice requirement.

Dance Technique/Physical Practice options:

511/611

Ballet

1 credit each

513/613

Modern Dance

1 credit each

515/615

Ann Arbor Dance Works Technique

1 credit each

516/616

Paul Taylor Summer Intensive Technique

1 credit each

518/618

Field Experience: Dance Technique

1-3 credits each

519/619

Independent Study: Dance Technique

Note: Other techniques may be taken via Independent Study Dance Technique courses (519/619). Through this course election, students may enroll in Congolese Dance, Afro-Caribbean Dance, and in Yoga for graduate-level credit.

1-3 credits each

COGNATES

6-10 credits

Cognates to comprise at least two graduate-level courses of at least two credit hours each outside the Department of Dance. These can be taken in other departments within the School of Music, Theatre & Dance (SMTD). MFA candidates are encouraged to seek cognates in units beyond SMTD.

THESIS

10 credits

595

Thesis 1: Summer Research Project

2 credits

695

Thesis 2: Proposal

2 credits

699

Thesis 3: Project

Note: Performative, Production and Documentation components

6 credits

(2 credits/ea)

                                                                                                           


Curriculum Notes

Credit for Paid Activities

Students cannot receive credit for paid activities.

Repertory Credit

Repertory credit is earned for participation in the University Dance Company’s annual Power Center concert, Ann Arbor Dance Works, the Paul Taylor Summer Intensive and independent faculty projects. Students earn one credit per repertory work.

Ann Arbor Dance Works

Formed in 1985, Ann Arbor Dance Works (AADW) is the resident professional dance company of the University of Michigan Department of Dance. The company shares a wide-ranging repertory with audiences in an annual season and in community performances. In addition to producing works by resident faculty choreographers, the company hosts guest artists from the United States and abroad. Designers, poets, videographers, visual artists, musicians and composers collaborate with company members, contributing to the creation of innovative and multi-layered works of resonance, depth, and beauty. Performers include faculty, guest artists, alumni, and current Dance students. Since its inception, Ann Arbor Dance Works has produced choreography to critical and popular acclaim in New York City, throughout the Midwest, and internationally. The company has also presented several large-scale site-specific dances with a variety of Ann Arbor community partners. Ann Arbor Dance Works holds Spring Term courses in technique and repertory. Students may participate in repertory works only by invitation/audition, and must sign a contract. Special fees are associated with enrolling in AADW spring term courses. For further information: annarbordanceworks.com.

Paul Taylor Summer Intensive

Students receive technique and repertory credit for the annual UM/Paul Taylor Summer intensive. The Paul Taylor Dance Company determines the Artistic Director(s) and repertory. Special fees are associated with enrolling in this intensive. NOTE: Not offered every year. Applications for the UM intensive must be made directly via the PTDC website.

Independent Study

Independent Study courses enable students to engage in in-depth research in the following areas:

                                                                       

  • Dance Technique
  • Performance/Repertory
  • Choreography
  • Screendance
  • Dance Science
  • Dance History
  • Dance Education

To complete an Independent Study form, the student must contact the SMTD Advising and School Registrar’s office: Deedee Ulintz: dianals@umich.edu, 734-764-0592 or Tom Erickson: tericks@umich.edu, 734-764-8623. The student should let Deedee or Tom know which instructor they would like to do their independent study with. Deedee or Tom will then send them the Independent Study form via Signnow. While filling out the form, keep in mind that approximately 42 hours of work equals one credit when computing the number of credit hours elected. The student should work with their instructor to fill out all the information on the form and should provide their instructor with a one-page typed rationale detailing the proposed activity and justifying the credit hours requested. Once all signatures are attained and the form is approved, Deedee or Tom will issue an override for the course. Please refer to the School of Music, Theatre & Dance Student Handbook for more information.

Field Experience

Field Experience courses enable students to obtain credit for teaching, performing, choreographing, producing, directing, consulting or researching outside the university setting in the following areas:

  • Dance Technique
  • Performance/Repertory
  • Choreography
  • Screendance
  • Dance Science
  • Dance History
  • Dance Education

Field Experience forms, available at the Department of Dance, must be completed and accompanied by a one-page typed rationale detailing the proposed activity and justifying the credit hours requested (42 hours of work equals one credit when computing the number of credit hours elected). After the individual advisor has reviewed and signed-off the proposal, it must be presented to the Chair for approval. The completed and approved Field Experience form serves as an override request and must be submitted to the Department Administrator.

Cognates

MFA Dance students meet this 6-10 credit requirement by enrolling in approved graduate level courses beyond the Department. Other School of Music, Theatre & Dance graduate courses (Theatre, Music Theory, Musicology, etc.) are acceptable. However, we strongly encourage students to seek out graduate-level courses in related areas in other Schools and Colleges and, thus, experience the wider expertise, resources and interactions that contribute to the University of Michigan’s leading academic position and reputation.

*** For graduate courses in other SMTD departments, please refer to the Elections Across Fields document.

Course Descriptions

• There may be some differences in the course descriptions between those found in this handbook and on Wolverine Access.
• Please see the individual advisor or the Department Administrator for any questions.
• Not all courses are offered all terms/years.

501 – Research in Action 1: Research Methods in Dance

This course equips students with the knowledge and skills to engage in dance research. It introduces them to the rich material resources of the University and the broader research community. A range of theoretical frameworks and methodologies will be addressed, as will strategies for designing a research project, determining a clear rationale and appropriate parameters, and articulating particular research questions. The aim is for students to understand current debates, the nature of evidence and argument, and the relationships between practice, theory and criticism.

502 – Research in Action 2: Problematizing Theory in Practice

This course helps students consider how dancemaking is an act of theorizing and, too, how reading and writing theory might be a form of feeding one’s artistic practice. The aim of the course is to interrogate key questions and issues currently shaping the dance field, and to consider how these questions inform students’ practice, especially as they prepare for their summer fieldwork as a step toward their thesis project. Students will engage critically with selected readings, performances, and studio research in order to develop a sophisticated grasp of different approaches to dance-making and scholarship, and greater fluency in working across dance theory-practice areas. Assessment for the course will be by written, oral and embodied assignments—all explicitly shaped to deepen the students’ artmaking and performance practices.

505 – Research in Action 3: Self-Evaluation Report

This course requires students to reflect critically on their first year of Master’s level study and to write a 3500-word (or equivalent) report. Detailed reference should be made to their learning in the core Research in Action courses (RIA 1 and RIA 2) and connections made to other areas of the program, most particularly to the students’ designated track. The aim is for students to demonstrate competence in working across theory-practice realms and to identify realistic next steps and further training needs. The paper is due on August 1 and should be submitted to the individual advisor, who will evaluate the paper and submit the grade.

511 – Ballet

This course focuses on proper alignment, placement, body awareness, self-discovery, self-correction, execution, awareness of other dancers and teaching techniques. The vocabulary encompasses a logical development of more advanced barre and center work including advanced pirouettes, enchainment’s, and grand allegro. Through repetition of material, students will be challenged to reverse combinations, recite terminology, and demonstrate combinations without the assistance of demonstration by the instructor.

513 – Modern Dance

This course develops movement skills and concepts within contemporary dance genres towards effective performance. It stresses the development of musicality, versatility, and expressivity, sensitivity, range, control, and clarity of performance, with sound anatomical principles as well as a wide range of spatial, rhythmic and dynamic qualities.

515 – Ann Arbor Dance Works: Technique

This course will be an intermediate-advanced modern dance technique class taught by resident dance faculty and guest artists, offering techniques that reflect a variety of styles and trends in the field.

516 – Paul Taylor Summer Intensive: Technique

This course introduces students to Taylor technique, as taught by guest faculty from the Paul Taylor Dance Company in residence at UM. Daily technique classes are supported by Ballet and Somatic work. Enrollment for the intensive is required through the Paul Taylor School.

518 – Field Experience: Dance Technique

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance technique project beyond the University of Michigan. The field of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

519 – Independent Study: Dance Technique

This course is designed for students who wish to study one or more dance techniques in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

521 – University Dance Company

This course requires a commitment to the creative and rehearsal process in preparation for performances of new or repertory work for the annual University Production concert. The cast of student dancers works with a choreographer to evolve a finished production - involving the integration of choreographic intention and style with musical score, sets, props, costuming, video, or other scenic components.

524 – Solo Performance

This course explores diverse choreographic materials from the repertory, spanning mid-20th century to the present. Students learn solo passages from various seminal works and practice the embodiment of style, musicality, intention and movement dynamics specific to that choreographer, her/his work and the cultural and aesthetic contexts of creations. The class develops the practical skills for reconstruction and criteria for verbal and written evaluation of each other's performances.

525 – Ann Arbor Dance Works: Repertory

In this course, dancers will learn modern dance repertory taught by resident faculty and guest artists, which will be performed for the public in a formal performance. Dancers will be cast in repertory works by audition. They may be cast in one work for 1 credit, or two works for 2 credits. The course may also include a residency in a community setting; the residency may entail the offering of master classes, lecture demonstrations, workshops and performances. Dancers may assist with designing and implementing community residencies.

526 – Paul Taylor Summer Intensive: Repertory

Students will learn selected works from Paul Taylor’s diverse choreographic oeuvre, as taught by company members and alumni in residence at the UM/Paul Taylor Summer Intensive. Students will learn between 2-3 repertory excerpts over the course of the two-week program. Studio learning is supported by lectures and readings on Taylor’s style. Enrollment required in the UM/Paul Taylor Summer Intensive program coordinated through the School of the Paul Taylor Dance Company.

527 – Special Topics: Performance/Repertory

Special Topics courses in performance/repertory allow students the flexibility to pursue discipline-specific or interdisciplinary study in-depth, led by a specialist instructor/guest artist. The courses will differ thematically, dependent upon the teaching and research expertise of the instructor.

528 – Field Experience: Performance/Repertory

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a performance or repertory project beyond the University of Michigan. The 'field' of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

529 – Independent Study: Performance/Repertory

This course is designed for students who wish to study one or more dance performance or repertory experiences in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

531 – Solo Composition

Students will deepen their compositional skills through a variety of studies. The class will primarily focus on the development of a significant solo that clearly demonstrates mastery of the student's choreography/performance skills. Students will be challenged to use their craft to communicate, with clarity and conviction, the expressive content that inspires and drives their creative impulse.They will revisit the concepts of space, shape, time, and motion; elements of direction, focus, density and overall design concepts. Students will also study current and innovative practitioners and their choreographic methods.

532 – Choreography, Performance, Production & Design

The primary focus of this course is specifically to develop a group work as well as an array of choreographic studies and works to be presented in a fully produced evening concert at the end of the Winter term. Students in the class will design the lighting, costumes, posters, and programs. Participants in the class will be asked to engage in an on-going process of analysis and discussion/feedback of their choreographic materials. Making dances, speaking and writing eloquently about the process will guide the work. The grading formula is as follows: 1/3 for performance, 1/3 for choreography and 1/3 for production participation. The department pays for publicity, programs and tickets up to $200.

534 – Performance Improvisation 1

This course introduces students to the practice of improvisation as a performing art. They will engage as artist, soloist, collaborator and, collectively, create a performance ensemble. Theory and practice will be combined through journaling, reading, writing a program note and a final paper.


535 – Mapping Movement and Place: Site Dance Composition

Through readings, video viewings and performance projects, this course will examine the creative processes for a variety of contemporary site-specific dance performances. Dancers will conduct research about a chosen site, and will choreograph and perform in their own site-specific dance project. Emphasis will be placed upon investigating the social and cultural histories of the chosen site, and of its environmental and/or architectural features.

536 – Dramaturgy for Physical Practice

This course exposes students to the field of dramaturgy, a creative and scholarly practice in which individuals assist a choreographer, director, and, in general, a creative team through a variety of research-based practices. To prepare students to engage in dramaturgy, this course surveys relevant literature in the field, including recently published articles and books on dramaturgy, which has exploded in North American research in the last decade, and theoretical texts that offer larger frames to consider the nature of dramaturgy in physical performance, particularly dance. Students also work on developing skills for specific tasks often associated with dramaturgy: leading feedback sessions, creating different formats for assessing a piece’s overall structure, developing research packets and questions, and facilitating post-performance discussions, among others. Whenever possible, students enrolled in the course will be attached to ongoing performance projects.

538 – Field Experience: Choreography

This course is designed for students seeking credit for creating and producing new choreography outside the university setting.

539 – Independent Study: Choreography

This course is designed for students who wish to study one or more choreography experiences in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

542 – Screendance 1: Collaborations in New Media

This course introduces the fusion of movement, camera work, and editing on Final Cut Pro. An interdisciplinary course that attracts students from Dance, Performing Arts Technology, Art and Design, and Screen Arts and Cultures, it challenges students from diverse disciplines to compose short works for the screen in a series of 5-6 assignments. Informed by class screenings of student assignments, professional works, and historically significant films and videos, the course develops confidence and skills in the making of screendance and criteria for evaluating this relatively new but increasingly visible art form. The course hosts an annual UM Dance on Camera Festival of works curated from that year's New York Dance on Camera Festival at Lincoln Center.

543 – Screendance Portfolio

Students will compile their portfolio by creating an appropriate range of screendance works, the number and duration of which will be determined in consultation with their Portfolio Advisor. They may choose solo and/or group works, and edit their material using non-linear video editing software. The Screendance Portfolio will be accompanied by a written justification.


546 – Dancing Women/Dancing Queer

Studying gender and sexuality through dance and performance foregrounds questions about embodiment that run across feminist and queer theory, as well as dance and performance studies. This graduate and upper-level undergraduate seminar will look at a representation of gender and sexuality across a variety of sites from ballet to modern dance, the concert stage to the music video, and Broadway to avant garde solo performance. No previous experience with dance required

548 – Field Experience: Screendance

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a screendance project beyond the University of Michigan. The 'field' of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

549 – Independent Study: Screendance

This course is designed for students who wish to study a screendance project in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

551 – Experiential Anatomy

This course introduces students to the scientific principles underlying the complexities of dance movement. Utilizing visual stimuli, touch, writing and drawing, readings, and experiential modalities such as Ideokinesis, Feldenkrais, visualization, and Alexander technique, students will learn to apply the principles of anatomy and kinesiology, as they pertain to dance. Rarely offered.

558 – Field Experience: Dance Science

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance science project beyond the University of Michigan. The 'field' of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

559 – Independent Study: Dance Science

This course is designed for students who wish to study a dance science topic in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

562 – Reading & Writing Dance Criticism

This course focuses on writers who assess and describe dance from a variety of perspectives, for a variety of audiences, in a variety of formats. Study of major dance critics from the 19th century to the present day will also provide a springboard for students to experiment with the process of writing themselves.


563 – Dancing Diasporas

Using a chronological and geographical approach, this course examines Africanist performance trends in dance music and theater, tracing them from West Africa through the African Diaspora in the Americas. Movement and aesthetic commonalities of these forms will be studied, together with the socio-culture conditions that contributed to their creation and which continue to influence American dance and culture today. Issues of identity, ethnicity and stereotyping through the idiom of African-Americans vernacular and concert dance will also be addressed. Rarely offered.

564 – Balanchine & the Transformation of America Dance

This course examines the life and works of dancer/choreographer George Balanchine and his influence on 20th-21st century dance. It complements and supplements the more general topic and broadly themed courses in the curriculum with an opportunity for students to focus in on an extensive and intensive examination of a key figure in the history of dance and his works. Students will gain experience in original historical research with archival material, concentrating on primary sources of all kinds in conjunction with intensive analysis of Balanchine’s choreography. Not offered AY 17-18.

567 – Special Topics: Dance History

Special Topics courses in dance history allow students the flexibility to pursue discipline-specific or interdisciplinary study in-depth, led by a specialist instructor/historian. The courses will differ thematically, dependent upon the teaching and research expertise of the instructor.

568 – Field Experience: Dance History

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance history project beyond the University of Michigan. The 'field' of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

569 – Independent Study: Dance History

This course is designed for students who wish to study a dance history topic in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

571 – Pedagogy: Dance Technique

Exploration of theoretical concepts, principles, and methods of teaching dance technique through lectures, readings, videos, discussion and teaching practicum with the goal of developing a sound basis for continued growth and effectiveness as dance educators.

572 – Pedagogy: Dance Composition

This course addresses strategies for teaching undergraduate-level Dance Composition. Graduate students will participate in teaching a sophomore-level majors course, 232 Dance Composition IV: Mapping Movement and Sound. They will lead improvisational exercises and provide critical feedback sessions for students. They will also research the use of music/sound in the works of selected choreographers and present this research. They will be assessed through these and other assignments, including self-evaluation papers, teaching philosophy statements, and the creation of a syllabus for beginning-level dance composition students.

575 – Pedagogy: Dance History

This course provides supervision and mentoring of MFA Dance students in Dance History pedagogy and addresses strategies for teaching undergraduate courses in this area.

578 – Field Experience: Dance Education

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance education project beyond the University of Michigan. The 'field' of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

579 – Independent Study: Dance Education

This course is designed for students who wish to study a dance education project in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

583 – Dance & Related Arts

Dance students collaborate with composers, visual artists, videographers, etc. to create an evening-length happening/collage/performance.

586 – Accompanying Movement

In this course, musicians will learn how to accompany for kinesthetic, movement-based art forms through the study and analysis of western dance technique classes. This will provide the musician with an entry into collaborating with movement-based art forms. Using both Modern Dance and Ballet Technique courses offered in the Department of Dance, musicians will observe and analyze the structure and content of the class, will research the specific genre of the class, and by observing the methods of communication used between instructor and dance student, instructor and musician, and dance student and musician, they will learn how to collaborate in a dance class. Through the course of the term, the student will accompany individual combinations for the class so that by the end of the term they will be able to provide appropriate music for an entire class session. This will provide the musician with an entry into collaboration with movement-based art forms.

595 – Thesis 1: Summer Research Project

Between the first and second year of the Masters' program, students will undertake extensive research off-campus, conducting fieldwork and developing material for their Thesis. The Summer Research Project comprises three components: 1) a 1,000-word proposal articulating the aims, methodology, research context and questions of the project, and of their relevance to the students' subsequent Thesis and to the field (20%). The summer research proposal must have a title.  Additionally, students must submit a detailed budget that must follow the budget template provided in MFA Resources on the Department website; 2) a minimum of 40 hours in the field' (50%); 3) a 15-minute presentation of results, to include audio-visual examples and/or a performative element, plus Q&A (30%).

601 – Research in Action 4: Dance History & Theory

This course introduces students to historical concepts, theories and methodologies, and to the major dance historians of the 19th-20th centuries. The aim is to develop a critical awareness of the competing constructions of dance history and of the interplay between history and other disciplines within and beyond dance. Students will interrogate different approaches to reading and writing our dancing past through the use of selected case studies, spanning textual, visual, oral and performative histories.

611 – Ballet

This advanced ballet course addresses core concepts of technique, alignment, anatomically sound movement, and artistry. Emphasis will be placed on more challenging combinations of movements so that students can explore transitions, musicality, increased mental acuity to remember new and complex sequences, and the ability to process information both in the brain and in the body.Students are encouraged to dance in three dimensions and to develop their individual sense of artistry through the class material. They should demonstrate a more advanced mastery of these concepts than in their first year of study.

613 – Modern Dance

This course requires the advanced level student to research and integrate compositional and performance methods into a lively and productive practice of dance-making. Through daily practice in class and in written assignments, students will acquire a sophisticated comprehension of the ways in which the creative process is embedded in technique. This course will act as an experiential laboratory for improvisation, composition and performance, anchored by sound technical practice. The study and practice of improvisation will serve as tools for both creative work in composition and performance. Elements of personal history and philosophy will be examined and questioned as a means of distilling idiosyncratic material into formal, shapely, dynamic and coherent structures. Exploring individual movement vocabularies will serve to refine and expand our physical language as form and structure emerges.

615 – Ann Arbor Dance Works: Technique

This is an advanced modern dance technique course taught by resident dance faculty and guest artists, offering a variety of styles and trends in the field.

616 – Paul Taylor Summer Intensive: Technique

This course introduces students to Taylor technique, as taught by guest faculty from the Paul Taylor Dance Company in residence at UM. Daily technique classes are supported by Ballet and Somatic work. Enrollment for the intensive is required through the Paul Taylor School.

618 – Field Experience: Dance Technique

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance technique project beyond the University of Michigan. The field of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

619 – Independent Study: Dance Technique

This course is designed for students who wish to study one or more dance techniques in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

621 – University Dance Company

This course requires a commitment to the creative and rehearsal process in preparation for performances of new or repertory work for the annual University Productions concert. Each cast works with a choreographer to evolve a finished production - involving the integration of choreographic intention and style with musical score, sets, props, costuming, video or other scenic components. The highest degree of professionalism is assumed and expected of second-year graduate students, who act as role models for their younger peers and may also serve as choreographic/rehearsal assistants.

625 – Ann Arbor Dance Works: Repertory

In this course, students will learn modern dance repertory taught by resident faculty and guest artists, to be performed for public performance. Dancers will be cast in repertory works by audition. The course may also include a residency in a community setting; the residency may entail the offering of master classes, lecture demonstrations, workshops and performances. Dancers will assist with designing and implementing community residencies. Each repertory work will have 6 - 10 hours of rehearsal per week. 1 credit per repertory work is offered and students may be cast in up to three works.

626 – Paul Taylor Summer Intensive: Repertory

Students will learn selected works from Paul Taylor’s diverse choreographic oeuvre, as taught by company members and alumni in residence at the UM/Paul Taylor Summer Intensive. Students will learn between 2-3 repertory excerpts over the course of the two-week program. Studio learning is supported by lectures and readings on Taylor’s style. Enrollment required in the UM/Paul Taylor Summer Intensive program coordinated through the School of the Paul Taylor Dance Company.

627 – Special Topics: Performance/Repertory

Special Topics courses in performance/repertory allow students the flexibility to pursue discipline-specific or interdisciplinary study in-depth, led by a specialist instructor/guest artist. The courses will differ thematically, dependent upon the teaching and research expertise of the instructor.

628 – Field Experience: Performance/Repertory

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a performance or repertory project beyond the University of Michigan. The 'field' of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

629 – Independent Study: Performance/Repertory

This course is designed for students who wish to study one or more dance performance or repertory experiences in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.


631 – Graduate Studio

This course creates a forum for graduate students to investigate and workshop ideas, movement studies, production elements and choreographic projects with their peers and instructor to further investigatetheembodiment of their thesis project materials. The primary goal of this course is to learn how to formulate questions about the act and creation of new work. Incentive and critical feedback are provided in order to push expectations, foster creative risk-taking and to maximize students’ talent as performers and dance makers. Studio practice is supported by video viewings, readings, and discussion. The course meets once a week for 2 hours with additional lab time for independent research and sketching of movement materials. Thesis chairs and committee members will be invited to periodic showings and discussions oftheevolving materials.

634 – Performance Improvisation 2

This course is devoted to in-depth study and practice of improvisation as a performing art. In improvisation, insight, inspiration, composition and performance occur simultaneously. The constant flux and exchange of doing and reflecting heightens awareness of compositional choices. The improvising performer works without a net, where every choice and action is visible and audible. Recognizing the three strands of improvisational practice: bodily exploration, honing and cultivating aesthetic values and observational skills, and composing dances in the moment will influence and shape the learning process. Each student will be called upon to develop as an artist, a soloist, and as a collaborator as we build a movement and music ensemble that can co-create shapely, coherent, short and long pieces through improvisation. The course will culminate in a performance at the close of the semester. Two reading and writing assignments per week will support and encourage thoughtful analysis and practice. The final summary paper will connect experience in class, journal entries, discussions and the reading assignments into a meaningful anthology.

638 – Field Experience: Choreography

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a choreography project beyond the University of Michigan. The 'field' of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

639 – Independent Study: Choreography

This course is designed for students who wish to study one or more choreography experiences in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

642 – Screendance 2: Advanced Projects & Productions

Building upon the editing and camera skills, and creative research acquired in 542 Screendance 1, (prerequisite), this course challenges the student to propose three projects ranging from work for the screen, work for gallery or installation, and work for integration into live performance. In collaboration with faculty advisors and chosen venue, the student will then select one proposed project for completion and final production. Students are strongly encouraged to submit work(s) to festivals and/or present finished work(s) to audiences in innovative formats.

643 – Screendance Portfolio

Assemble and analyze a collection of screen dance examples demonstrating a specific artistic perspective. The choice and number of the works in the portfolio will be determined by the student and her/his chosen advisor and can comprise solo and/or group works. A written justification of the portfolio will serve as the analysis of the portfolio. The portfolio should demonstrate the student’s growth as a screen dance artist since his/her first year of graduate study.

648 – Field Experience: Screendance

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a screendance project beyond the University of Michigan. The field of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

649 – Independent Study: Screendance

This course is designed for students who wish to study a screendance project in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

658 – Field Experience: Dance Science

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance science project beyond the University of Michigan. The field of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

659 – Independent Study: Dance Science

This course is designed for students who wish to study a dance science project in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

661 – Reading & Writing Dance History

This course examines the nature and purposes of history by interrogating a range of theories, practices and issues both from within and outside dance. Case studies will be used to enable students to engage critically with notions and schools of history, different constructions of dance and performance histories, multiple and/or conflicting interpretations and current debates. Students will analyze a range of written, oral, visual and electronic source materials and will be encouraged to develop independent arguments and offer alternative readings.

667 – Special Topics: Dance History

Special Topics courses in dance history allow students the flexibility to pursue discipline-specific or interdisciplinary study in-depth, led by a specialist instructor/historian. The courses will differ thematically, dependent upon the teaching and research expertise of the instructor.


668 – Field Experience: Dance History

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance history project beyond the University of Michigan. The field of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

669 – Independent Study: Dance History

This course is designed for students who wish to study a dance history project in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

678 – Field Experience: Dance Education

This course is designed for students who wish to undertake a dance education project beyond the University of Michigan. The field of study is determined by the student, as is the nature and scope of the project, in consultation with a designated advisor. Such a project can be undertaken locally, nationally or overseas, with the number of credit hours determined by the project's parameters, timescale and complexity.

679 – Independent Study: Dance Education

This course is designed for students who wish to study a dance education project in-depth. The nature of the investigation is student-designed and directed, in consultation with a designated advisor. Both methodology and outcomes can be either practice-based or follow more traditional scholarly forms, for example, a final research paper or conference presentation.

695 – Thesis 2: Proposal

Following the students' Summer Research Project presentation, their next steps are to scope the Thesis proper and to select their Committee. A thesis chair should be determined by October 1 and the student should then meet with his/her Chair to discuss the overall design of the project. A Thesis Committee, comprising an additional Dance faculty member and a relevant expert from beyond the Department, should be determined by November 1 and a full proposal submitted to the thesis chair by December 1. The 3,000-word Thesis Proposal should include the following:

 

  • a working title which articulates the research focus
  • project parameters and objectives
  • theoretical/practical perspective and proposed methodology
  • key research questions and/or issues
  • a critical review of the literature and other sources that will inform the research
  • a proposed timetable for the execution of the project
  • a budget that must follow the budget template found on the Department website under “MFA Resources.”

699 – Thesis 3: Project

The thesis project comprises three components. The project must include a performative element (2 credits), production work (2 credits), and final written Documentation (2 credits).

 

MFA Thesis Process & Guidelines

Thesis Protocols & Timelines
The purpose of this chart is to guide graduate students, thesis chairs and thesis committee members as to who is responsible for certain tasks and when they are due.

Year 1– Fall Term

Timeframe

Details

Sept-Dec

In DANCE 501, students develop initial ideas for summer research and create a draft grant proposal.

Year 1 – Winter Term

Timeframe

Details

Jan

In DANCE 595, students write a 1,000-word summer research proposal and accompanying budget and submit to the individual advisor for feedback.

Feb

Students revise summer research proposal and budget. Note: The Rackham deadline is early February. 

Mar 1

Proposal for venue and dates for Thesis project due.

Apr 1

Finalize venue and dates for Thesis performance.

April 21

Students submit summer research proposal (written portion of Dance 595 Thesis 1 Summer Research Project course) and budget to department chair. The budget template found on MFA Resources, Dept. of Dance website, must be used.

Late Apr

Department chair notifies students re: Department support for summer research. 

May-Aug

As part of DANCE 595, students spend a minimum of 40 hours in the field where s/he maintains a digital journal of summer research, a weekly blog detailing evolving ideas and practice with feedback from a summer research advisor.

Year 2– Fall Term

Timeframe

Details

Sept

As part of DANCE 595, students present summer research findings to the full faculty (15 min. + 5 min. Q&A)

Oct 1

Students declare thesis chair via email to department chair, graduate director, and individual advisor, cc thesis chair and department administrator.

Oct 14

MFA Thesis Project Timeline due to production assistant, Graduate Studio instructor, and thesis chair. See MFA Resources on Dept. of Dance website for thesis timeline template.

Oct-Nov

As part of DANCE 695, students write 3,000-word thesis proposal; thesis chair oversees process.

Nov 1

As part of DANCE 695, students declare thesis committee via email to department chair, graduate director, and individual advisor, cc thesis chair and department administrator. Outside thesis committee members must be given a copy of Appendix C, so that they are aware of their commitment as committee members.

Dec 1

As part of DANCE 695, students submit thesis proposal and budget to thesis chair for review. The budget template found on MFA Resources, Dept. of Dance website, must be used.

Dec 22

As part of DANCE 695, students submit thesis proposal and budget to department chair. The budget template found on MFA Resources, Dept. of Dance website, must be used.

Dec

For DANCE 695, thesis chair submits grade to individual advisor.

Year 2, Winter Term and Deadlines FOR APRIL & AUGUST GRADUATION

Timeframe

Details

Jan 4

Contact Rackham/Julia Thiel to ascertain that all credits for the MFA will be completed by the end of Winter term.

Jan

Department chair notifies students re: thesis project funding support.

Mar

Apply for graduation for winter or summer term (date on Rackham website) if student wants their name in the commencement book.

Mar/Apr

Perform, choreograph and produce final MFA Thesis Project.

Apr

Must apply for Winter graduation by the last day of classes! Begin Rackham audit process.

Mar-May

Within two weeks of completion of MFA Thesis Project, meet with full thesis committee for 1.5-2 hours.

May 20

Submit 20-25-page draft of thesis documentation to thesis chair.

June 1

Submit a revised draft of thesis documentation to other committee members.

Jul 1

Submit final version of Digital Thesis Project Portfolio to Department Administrator and Dance Technology Coordinator.

By Jul 15

Check in with thesis chair to remind them to submit final grade for DANCE 699 Thesis 3: Project.

Aug

Apply for Summer graduation by last day of Summer term.

Aug

Department chair submits Degree Checkout Status form to Rackham.

Applying for Graduation & Deadlines

To receive the Master's degree, students must apply for graduation through Wolverine Access. If the exact degree/diploma does not appear on Wolverine Access, contact the Department of Dance before applying. Students who have applied for degree by the Master's and Certificate deadline will have their names printed in the Commencement program. Applications for graduation will be accepted until the last day of classes of the term in which the students wish to receive the degree/diploma; however, the student’s name will not appear in the Commencement program.

Students may walk at graduation at the end of Winter term in the 2nd year but must apply for Summer graduation and submit thesis materials by the July 1st deadline.

For more information, refer to the Rackham website:

rackham.umich.edu/help/graduating/masters_degree_diploma_application_deadlines

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that all requirements are met and recorded by the last day of classes in the term s/he has applied to graduate. If the student has questions about academic requirements please contact the individual advisor. For more information, please visit:

rackham.umich.edu/masters_students.

Production Policies & Performances

MFA Thesis Concert Protocols

The Department of Dance is committed to providing the optimum support possible to MFA candidates for their thesis performance/presentation projects. A practice and movement-based degree, as opposed to an MA-Ph.D. or academic degree, the MFA Thesis will be modeled on current forms of live performance production or screening and consist of scheduled events open to the public. As the culmination of the two-year program, the thesis project should reflect the candidate’s deepest engagement in his or her creative vision, research and craft. It should also reflect a working knowledge of the traditions and innovations of the field. These innovations often involve nonconventional concepts and applications of site; compositional structures and processes; new modes of integrating media; new performer/audience relationships; new modes of cultivating audiences; or new approaches to archiving the work. The Department has limited space, technical resources and crew for all of its productions. Therefore, the Department must approve all proposals for thesis performances/presentations, whether or not those remain within the existing in-house production schedule.

MFA Thesis Performances – Betty Pease Studio Theater

The Production Director reserves dates for MFA concerts to be held in the Betty Pease Studio Theater, including technical rehearsals, and posts them to the Department of Dance calendar in September of each year. The faculty will meet to determine the MFA thesis performance/presentation dates at the end of the preceding winter term. There will be a maximum of two in-house performance/presentation dates, typically in late March-early April, for the 3-4 candidates to share. 

MFA Thesis Performances – Off-site

Candidates may choose to craft their performances/presentations in alternative sites beyond our in-house Betty Pease Studio Theater. In order to present the thesis project in an alternative venue, the student must submit a proposal to the Dance faculty by March 1.Dates and venues for the thesis projects must be finalized by April 1.A written proposal for an alternative venue should include the following information, and will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria:

  • Appropriateness to candidate’s concentration, artistic vision and concept
  • Scale of production fits available resources, both human (cast, crew, faculty and committee involvement) and technical (lighting, sound, seating, etc.)
  • Production budget fits available financial resources (grants, etc.)
  • Production locates and secures appropriate site, taking into account access, liability and all other permissions
  • Production fits within existing Department schedule for access to students and faculty, without conflicts with other Departmental events

It is the candidate’s responsibility to be alert to guidelines and deadlines and be proactive in communicating with faculty advisor(s).

Thesis Performance Protocol

MFA students are responsible for the audition process of BFA students for their thesis performance/presentation. Props may be stored in the Prop Room during rehearsals for the MFA thesis performance/presentation and must be removed one week after the performance/presentation ends. Costumes are the MFA student’s dancers’ responsibility, but some options may be available to rent from the Department’s costume room.

Required MFA Thesis Project Timeline

MFA students must submit a MFA Thesis Project Timeline to the Production Assistant, Graduate Studio instructor, and Thesis Chair by October 15. Printed copies of the timeline should be provided to all collaborators. In addition, it is the student’s responsibility to keep track of these dates and deadlines. Creating Google Calendar events for the student’s own personal prompting and deadline management is an available tool. These calendar events (deadlines) can then be shared with collaborators, thesis committee members, etc.

The timeline must include:

  • A schedule for completion of production elements, including set, costumes, projections, props, lighting design, sound design, music composition, etc.
  • Projected meetings with collaborators and production team members
  • Rehearsals with cast members
  • Dates for submission of requests for music, images, and/or text permissions
  • Dates for timely submissions of all marketing materials
  • Social media posting plan
  • Projected meetings with thesis committee members pre- and post- production
  • Thesis documentation deadlines

An MFA Thesis Project Timeline Template is available in the Dance Resources section of the Department website.

Publicity Materials

All Department of Dance publicity materials must be approved by the Dance Technology Coordinator and submitted to the Dance Office before being posted or printed. If the student produces work beyond the Department, the student is expected to provide hardcopy and electronic copies of each item – plus links to any relevant websites – to the administrator to be posted in the Dance facilities and for the Department archive. Graphic design is an iterative process that tends to require multiple drafts. Failure to adhere to the marketing timeline may result in losing the administrative and financial support of the Department.

Poster Design

Required elements and helpful hints for designing a poster are located in the Resources section of the Department of Dance website, as well as poster templates the student could use as they begin. Items that the poster must contain are also listed here:

University of Michigan (not “U of M”)

Department of Dance (MUST be listed)

Dance Building, Betty Pease Studio Theater

1310 N. University Court

Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2217

**If concert takes place at alternate site (e.g., Duderstadt or University of Michigan Museum of Art), ensure that the student has the complete address, logos, and that they are using unabbreviated venue names.

  • For additional information: (734) 763-5461 (or the student’s personal contact information)
  • For directions: (734) 763-5461
  • Concert title
  • Times, month, dates, and year of concert
  • Make sure to correctly acknowledge any/all funding sources and/or in-kind support.
  • Ticket prices (ticket template available from Production Director)
  • Box office opens at 7:00PM
  • The statement, “This concert is being held in partial fulfillment of the Department of Dance Master of Fine Arts Degree Requirements”

Program Design

Required elements and helpful hints for designing a program are located in the Resources section of the Department of Dance website, as well as a program template the student could use as they begin. Items that the program must contain are also listed here:

University of Michigan (not “U of M”)

Department of Dance (MUST be listed)

  • Concert title
  • Times, month, dates, and year of concert
  • Make sure to correctly acknowledge any/all funding sources and/or in-kind support.
  • List choreographer names
  • List the production staff (check with Production Director for list)
  • Friends of Dance announcement on the back cover (see Dance Technology Coordinator for text content)
  • The statement, “This concert is being held in partial fulfillment of the Department of Dance Master of Fine Arts Degree Requirements”

Digital Thesis Project Portfolio Guidelines

To complete the MFA, a Digital Thesis Project Portfolio (DTPP) must be submitted to the Dance Administrator and Dance Technology Coordinator. The portfolio will be a series of files, organized into the following seven (7) folders. Files must be named appropriately for clear reference. The DTPP folder must be submitted on a flash drive, SD card, or sent through an appropriate file sharing method (M+Box, GoogleDrive, Dropbox, etc.). The student will receive an email confirming receipt of the submission.

Please send the Portfolio by July 1 to Sean Hoskins: hoskinss@umich.edu; Jessica Fogel: jkfogel@umich.edu; Katie Gunning: kgunning@umich.edu; and the student’s thesis chair. They will check for the completeness of the student’s submission and share with the Dance Department chair and the student’s thesis chair.

 

Digital Thesis Project Portfolio Components

  • Contributor List
  • Thesis Paper, including correctly formatted Cover Page, Abstract, Acknowledgements, and paper itself.
  • Videos – full length work(s) [Include title and credits for music, performance venue & date, etc.]
  • Photographs
    • Costumes & Set Design – Photos or scans
    • Performance & Rehearsal – Photographer in file name
  • Lighting and Stage Cues
  • Program and Marketing Materials
    • Flyer, Poster, Advertisement, Press Article(s)
    • Press Release
    • Program
  • Thesis Supporting Documents
    • Thesis 1: Summer Research Proposal & Presentation
    • Thesis 2: Proposal & Budget
    • A representative grant application that was submitted for the thesis (e.g. to Rackham, International Institute, CWPS, IRWG)

Thesis Hard Copy Component

Additionally, the student must submit a hard copy of the thesis paper with appropriate cover page, abstract, acknowledgments, and narrative to the Dance Technology Coordinator by July 1.

MFA Graduation Checklist

The MFA Graduation Checklist, Appendix B, serves as the official sign-off of the completed thesis, and ensures that the MFA candidate is aware of the various necessary components for graduation. The MFA candidate must submit the checklist to the Dance office along with the hard copy of the thesis paper. The MFA candidate will begin filling out the checklist, and the Department Chair, Thesis Chair, and Dance Technology Coordinator will add signatures confirming receipt of materials, etc.

Archiving the Thesis Project Portfolio

The submitted Digital Thesis Project Portfolio will be kept in the Dance Library, saved and backed-up in the Digital Dance Archive hard drive and server space. It will be made available to faculty and students.

 

Details Regarding the Digital Thesis Project Portfolio Components

  • Contributor List
    • Credit must be given to all contributors to the student’s thesis project, in its multiple phases and areas. This is a document designed to credit these contributors and collaborators to the production aspects of the student’s project in a single consolidated place.
    • The people who should be credited in this document include (these list items made plural where applicable):
      • Sound designer/composer/engineer
      • Set designer
      • Costume designer
      • Projection designer
      • Lighting Designer
      • Photographer
      • Videographer
      • Graphic Designer
      • Etc.
    • This document is in addition to the Acknowledgements section – explained below. It is fine if people appear in both, if applicable.

 

 

 

 

 

Note: The student should be very detailed and thoughtful about the individual thesis project and attribute credit to the people with whom the student worked.

 

  • Thesis Paper
    • Assemble the following elements of the paper in this order:
      • Cover page
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgements
      • Thesis paper

 

 

 

 

 

Cover Page The following is a detailed model of what the thesis cover page should contain. All text should be centered vertically and horizontally on the page. Save as PDF.

coverpageexample

Notes on MFA Thesis Committee listing

  • Title (i.e. Professor) must be before the name. Must not include degree citation (i.e., Dr.)
  • Must be Chair (or Co-Chair) after the name. The word Chair or Co-Chair must not be in parentheses.
  • If a member is deceased, (Deceased) must be added to follow their name [e.g., Professor John Smith (Deceased)]
  • For Academic members from outside UM, a comma and the full name of the academic institution must follow the member’s name (e.g., Assistant Professor Jane Smith, University of Chicago)
  • For members of the private sector, a comma and the full company/organization name must follow the member’s name (e.g., Michael Smith, Ford Motor Co.)
  • The committee must be listed as follows (in alphabetical order by last name):
  • Chair or Co-Chairs

Professor rank (including Emeritus)

  • Associate Professors (including Emeritus)
  • Assistant Professors (including Emeritus)
  • Curators, research scientists, lecturers
  • Academic members from outside U-M
  • Those in the private sector

 Committee name listing must be single-line spaced

 

 

 

 

 Abstract

  • 350 Word
  • First or third person perspective
  • Include the primary research question that guided the project, an overview of the project’s methodology, and a brief description of the resulting performance. Give the reader a sense of the larger stakes of the project:
    • Why is this a research question that needs to be asked?
    • Why does it need to be explored via performance?
  • Anchored by its argument and by the key items of the project, literally, the words someone might search to find the project and/or website online
  • Save as a PDF

 

Acknowledgements

  • Include funding support and any faculty, peer(s), family, or friends the student cares to acknowledge.

 

 

 

Thesis paper

The paper is normally written in the first person, summarizing the creative process and including the following topics. Length is 20-25 pages, double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12-point font. Save as a PDF.

  • Describe the structure of dance(s) or screendance---the movement vocabulary, and the basic components: cast, productionelements, and the site(s) of the performance/screendance.
  • Discuss the work within the context of the larger field. What is the relationship of the thesis project to works of dance artists in a similar vein? Is the student working against/resisting particular aesthetics or points of view? With what larger ideas and/or artists does the student imagine the work to be in conversation?
  • How did the review of the “literature” contribute to the development of the thesis? Please note that “literature” is writ broadly, and may include print materials, live and recorded performances, online resources, social media resources, and interviews with professionals in the field.
  • How were the production elements integrated inthe work, and how did working with these elements shape the ideas? If relevant, discuss collaborations with designers (set, lighting, costume, video), writers, architects, scientists, other.
  • Discuss the sound/music choices, scores and/or composer, sound engineer collaboration. Discuss the ways movement is mapped with sound/music in the work and the ways this extends the meanings of the work, creates moods, atmospheres, dialogues, ironic juxtapositions, counterpoint. Did the student use live music? How did this influence the process and performance?
  • If the student created a screendance, how did their choices for internal and external editing shape the raw materials?
  • Discuss the evolution of work from initial explorations to the final product. What did the dancers bring to the work and how did this contribute to the student’s perspectives? How did things shift along the way? What were the student’s initial questions or impulses, ideas, interests, and how did they change within the process? Discuss the finished work’s relationship to initial summer research and thesis proposals.Once rehearsals began, how did they reveal their own distinctworld? How did the rehearsal process shape new questions?What challenges did the student face? How did casting and rehearsal methods shape the process?
  • Discuss the critical feedback the student received and the ways that shaped the process. How did the student assimilate critical feedback? Did the student work with a dramaturg? Who were the student’s sounding boards?
  • Reflecting on the student’s two-year experience as an MFA candidate, what is the student’s own understanding of practice as research, in terms of this thesis project?
  • Discuss any plans for future showings or revisions of the work. Identify suitable venues or presenters the student plans to contact to circulate this work for future presentation and/or to build relationships. Why are these suitable people for this work? Beyond logistical concerns, why or why not should this work be performed again?

 

Citing sources:

There are several formats for citing sources, and the student may choose to cite them using the MLA, APA, or Chicago styles. There are reasons for choosing different styles, which the student can determine in consultation with their thesis chair. Whichever style the student chooses, follow the guidelines carefully. Please refer to Purdue Owl for citation guidelines.

Another helpful resource is this: http://easybib.com/

A draft should be submitted to the thesis chair before being submitted to other committee members. Be sure to do careful editing of the written documentation before submitting it to the thesis chair. Valuable committee time should not be used for correcting grammar and syntax. If necessary, obtain editorial help from the Sweetland Writing Center or academic editing resources, and be sure to acknowledge contributions of an editor.

  • Videos
    • Full-length work(s) must be included in the portfolio.
    • Videos should be submitted in the following format: mp4 in full HD (1920x1080p).
    • A title/credits screen at the beginning of the video itself is recommended – including the title of the work, choreographer, other credits (sound, projection, etc.), dancer names, venue and date of performance.
  • Photographs
    • Costumes & Set Design
      • JPG and/or PDF, including any sketches/scans designers have provided.
      • High resolution (300dpi) and color
      • Credit all designers within the costume & set design folder.
    • Rehearsal & Performance
      • At least five photographs
      • JPG and/or PDF
      • High resolution (300dpi)
      • Credit all photographers in the file names.
  • Lighting and Stage Cues
    • PDF format
    • Cannot be the lighting plot
    • Credit the lighting designer and stage manager within the lighting and stage cues folder.
  • Program and Marketing Materials
    • This folder should contain the 1) press release and 2) flyer, poster, advertisement and press article(s).
    • PDF of press articles; PDF or JPEG of flyer, poster, ads.
    • Give full credit by noting all authors of press articles, dates, copyright holders, where applicable.  Also credit any graphic designers for flyers, program, poster.

 

  • Thesis Supporting Documents
    • Thesis 1: Summer Research Proposal & Presentation
    • Thesis 2: Proposal and Budget
    • A representative grant application that the student submitted for the thesis (e.g., to Rackham, the International Institute, CWPS, IRWG)

Communicating with the Thesis Chair

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that their thesis committee members--especially those outside the Department of Dance--are aware of their responsibilities. The student will do this by sharing the information below with them. See Appendix C for required handout/guidelines.

Digital Thesis Project Portfolio - Example

Here’s an example of the folder structure organizational scheme for the MFA digital thesis project portfolio:

digitalprojectexamplefolderstructure

 

Additional Curriculum Notes

Career Portfolio

* Note: The Career Portfolio is different from the Digital Thesis Project Portfolio.

In preparation for securing post-graduate work or continued education, students are required to develop, build, and hone a career development (a.k.a., exit) portfolio over the course of the two-year MFA. It will be reviewed periodically by the Dance faculty. Students can choose to design this as a public or private website or as a folder of digital documents.

The goal for creating this portfolio is to assist students in marketing themselves for academic and/or professional jobs. Components of the portfolio are created as required assignments within various MFA core courses. See Digital Career Portfolio Timeline for details. (following page)

The career portfolio should include the following components:

  • CV
  • Headshot
  • Videos
  • Biography
  • Artist statement
  • Chronology of performances and/or choreography
  • Upcoming projects (optional)
  • Teaching portfolio that includes, but is not limited to:
    • teaching philosophy
    • teaching resume
    • course syllabi including course descriptions
    • videos
    • photographs


Career Portfolio Timeline

Year 1 – Fall Term

Timeframe

Details

Sept-Dec

Within DANCE 571 Dance Pedagogy, students begin developing a Career Portfolio and create a first draft of their teaching philosophy statement and teaching resume. Other teaching portfolio materials, such as current syllabi, photographs and videos/DVDs of their teaching are to be included. Additional materials may include samples of student work and student evaluations.

Sept-Dec

Within courses 524/531, students develop and compile an artist statement, updated biography, and compile a chronology of creative/professional activities (i.e., a list of their performances, choreography, and/or screen dances to-date).

 

Year 2– Fall Term

Timeframe

Details

Sept-Dec

Students attend career development workshops at CRLT (Center for Research on Learning and Teaching) and The Career Center for assistance with cover letters, interviewing techniques, CVs, and to finalize the Career Portfolio. Individual advisor reviews completed Career Portfolio with advisee.

 

Entrepreneurial Skills and Career Strategies

The following are excellent University resources for strengthening entrepreneurial skills and career strategies:

Preparing Future Faculty Seminar

Another excellent program is Rackham’s Preparing Future Faculty Seminar, offered each May. Past MFA students have taken this course and have spoken highly of its help in guiding efforts and thinking, as well as the connections made with other students across the University.

CRLT Graduate Teaching Certificate

All Dance MFAs are eligible for a CRLT Graduate Teaching Certificate, without enrolling in any courses beyond our required MFA curriculum. For details on obtaining this certificate:

Crew Work for Department of Dance Productions

Production crew work is required for all students and is vital to the success of our concerts. MFA students must complete one in-house crew assignment. Such work will amount to no more than 32 hours per term. The Production Manager posts the assignments each term.

 

Rehearsal Space

Students must submit a request in writing to the Production Manager, providing date, time and location to reserve rehearsal space for a choreographic project or for teaching preparation. Reservation forms are available on the Production Schedule bulletin board and due by noon each Friday for the following week (Mon. thru Sun.). If a student needs to cancel reserved space use, they should post a rehearsal cancellation immediately.

* NOTE: Rehearsal space is at a premium in our Department. If none of our studios are available for rehearsal, students might try going next door to the CCRB where students can reserve a squash court with their student ID.

Outside Performances

Performances are encouraged beyond Department-sponsored events as long as the student’s schedule permits. In keeping with other departments in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, if involved in projects outside the Department, the student must:

  • Notify his/her individual advisor in writing of the engagement within the first two weeks of the semester so that any conflicting issues with the Department (e.g., resources, scheduling) may be addressed.
  • Make every effort not to miss regularly scheduled classes and rehearsals. When organizing or producing an outside event, it is the student’s responsibility as the choreographer to be respectful of dancers’ schedules and prior commitments. Please adapt schedules accordingly.
  • Follow Department guidelines as stated earlier in this handbook and the SMTD Student Handbook regarding the procedures for getting approval for absences incurred for outside performance.

Student Activities & Awards

DSA Representative

One MFA Dance student will represent the graduate students in DSA. It is this student’s responsibility to communicate with the MFA cohort and report back to DSA with any issues or suggestions. Grad students should plan to make time to meet as a year group a couple of times during each term to discuss progress and any concerns, as well as promote communication within the year group. The entire cohort of first and second year Dance MFAs will meet monthly with the Graduate Director.

American College Dance Association (ACDA)

Each year, two to three outstanding students are sponsored to present their choreography at the Regional conference. The faculty choose which works will attend the festival based on a department wide audition each fall. (Refer to the STMD absence policy stated earlier in this handbook regarding off-campus travel)

Emerging Dance Artists Concert

The Emerging Dance Artist (EDA) concert is a student choreographed and produced performance that takes place at the end of the Winter term. All students may participate. Refer to the bulletin boards in the Dance Building or see the Production Manager for more information and/or sign-up sheet.

SMTD Collage Concert

Each fall, SMTD puts out a call for applications for student performances to be included in the Collage Concert, produced at Hill Auditorium in mid-January. The much-anticipated annual Collage Concert never fails to amaze, with its distinctive format featuring the incredible range of SMTD ensembles and programs, with students performing one riveting work after another without pause. It’s a non-stop and exhilarating evening of virtuoso performances. It is a distinct honor to be chosen to participate in this significant performance. Students are chosen by a committee of faculty members composed from across SMTD. Collaborative works that feature live dance and live music are encouraged.

General Information & Resources

Graduate Student Services and Support

Dean of Students Office

CRLT – Center for Research on Learning and Teaching

Rackham Emergency Funds

The Rackham Graduate Student Emergency Fund is intended to help meet the financial needs of Rackham graduate students who encounter an emergency situation or one-time, unusual, or unforeseen expenses during their degree program. Situations eligible for funding include such events as:

  • Medical, dental or mental health emergencies for the student or, in some circumstances, for immediate family members* who live with the student
  • Major accidents and events such as fire and natural disasters
  • Expenses related to the death of an immediate family member*

Normal living expenses such as rent, car repairs, child care, utilities, taxes, insurance, pet-related expenses, and computer/laptop replacement are generally not covered by this fund.

* The immediate family consists of a student's spouse or other qualified adult; the son, daughter, parent, grandparent, grandchild, brother, sister (or the spouse of any of them), of either the student, the student’s spouse, the other qualified adult or any other related person living in the student’s household. The definition of other qualified adult may be found at http://www.umich.edu/~benefits/eligibility/oqa.html

Students who are experiencing financial difficulties that exceed the scope of this fund may contact Darlene Ray-Johnson by e-mail, or by phone, 734-764-4400.

Please visit: https://secure.rackham.umich.edu/Fellowships/apps/index.php?entry=8 to apply.

 

Graduate Student Funding

There are several sources of funding through the Rackham Graduate School including the Rackham Graduate Student Research Grant. For information go to rackham.umich.edu and select the link for Funding.

Also, consult the website for the International Institute and the various research centers:

Depending on the field of research, individual departments across campus may have additional funding sources.

 

Grant Sources at the University of Michigan

 

Complimentary Ticket Policy (SMTD)

Department of Dance students are eligible for complimentary ticket(s) for select ticketed performances during in the SMTD season produced by University Productions. Students are strongly encouraged to support their peers in the larger SMTD by attending these performances. Please reference the current season’s complimentary ticket policy emailed at the beginning of the school year. Copies of the policies are also available at the Department office.

GEO

The Graduate Employees’ Organization (GEO) is the labor union representing Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs) and Graduate Student Staff Assistants (GSSAs) at theUniversity of Michigan. GEO was founded in 1970 and won their first contract in 1975, making GEO one of the oldest graduate employee unions in the United States.

GEO is an activist, democratic and volunteer-run organization where graduate employees come together to improve our wages and working conditions. The collective action of GEO members, organized as a union, is responsible for many of the concrete benefits that graduate employees now enjoy. Over the last 40 years, victories have included tuition waivers, health benefits, and child care waivers as well as a powerful grievance procedure to protect our rights, transparent hiring processes, and standard setting non-discrimination language. Graduate employees across the country look to GEO as an example of what can be accomplished when we work together.

Visit the GEO website for more information.

Department of Dance Office

Office hours for the main office are approximately 9:00AM – 5:00PM. The office is closed for lunch on days when administrative support is not available.

Security

Building security is an important concern for Dance students, faculty and staff. Valuables, backpacks, clothing and jewelry, iPods/MP3 players, cell phones, books, etc. are all subject to theft. Keep valuables within eyesight, store them in the lockers, or keep them locked in the graduate student offices at the Geddes Building. It is also unsafe to be in the Dance Building alone in the evening and on weekends. The Department of Public Safety (DPS) should be called (734-763-1131) in every case of theft or suspicious activity in the building.

For added security, the Department of Dance has a card reader system located at the main entrance to the Dance Building. This means that unless the door is unlocked during regular class times (Mon.-Fri.) the building can be accessed only by using a MCard. The locking schedule for the card reader may vary throughout the year, so be sure to check with the Department Administrator for details. Additionally, there are several punch code locks throughout the Dance Building. This is typically a three-digit code that changes each term. Do not share this code with anyone outside the Department nor prop open a code-locked door to bypass this security measure.

The Geddes Building has three points of entry, two of which are located on the rear side of the house and should be locked and bolted at all times. The fire escape is located via office #3103 on the third floor.

 


stopsigngraphicFor Emergencies, call the Department of Public Safety (DPS) at 911!

Locker Space

Lockers are available for Dance majors and MFA students. Because graduate students have an office at the Geddes Building, undergraduate students will be given priority on choosing their lockers. Students must sign up for a locker number (lists are posted on the outside bathroom door). Students are responsible for providing their own lock, maintaining a record of the combination, and arranging for any services required to either unlock or cut off the lock.

 

Basic Building Information

Dance Building

  • Outside Doors are not to be propped open at any time
  • No smoking anywhere in the building
  • No alcoholic beverages in the building
  • No eating or drinking in the studios
  • Street shoes of any kind are not to be worn or taken into the studios
  • No items of any kind should be placed on pianos
  • No roller blades are to be worn in the building
  • Bicycles are not allowed in the building. Please lock bikes on the racks provided outside.
  • There are Lost and Found bins throughout in the Department located in each studio and in the student lounge. Non-clothing items (cell phones, IDs, jewelry, etc.) are held in the Dance Office.
  • Performance Lab blinds and windows should stay closed at all times. The door should always remain locked and closed and the door code should never be shared with non-Dance Majors.

1327 Geddes

  • Outside Doors are not to be propped open at any time
  • No smoking anywhere in the building
  • No alcoholic beverages in the building
  • No roller blades are to be worn in the building
  • Bicycles are not allowed in the building. Please park and lock bikes where provided outside.
  • Parking is reserved for the Department Chair, Administrator and guests only.
  • Students are responsible for cleaning up after themselves, especially in the kitchen.
  • If the student would like to use the Geddes conference room, please check with the Department Administrator first to determine availability.

Student Lounge at Dance Building

The Student Lounge is for relaxation, eating, student meetings, audition guests, and as a waiting area for visitors to the Department. Students are expected to clean up after themselves. There is a computer with Internet access, an SMTD-programmed television monitor, DVD and VHS machines, dance magazines purchased by the department, and a fridge, microwave and small coffeepot. Students are responsible for items left in the refrigerator; dirty utensils and empty/dirty containers must not be left in the fridge. There are cleaning supplies and storage bins available to maintain kitchen items and students should clean their dirty dishes and not leave them in the sink. Each semester, facilities will deep clean the refrigerator and sink. On this day (which will be posted in the student lounge), all personal items must be removed from the fridge or they are subject to being trashed. First aid supplies are kept in the bottom drawer of the storage bin in the student lounge. There is also always ice in the freezer for injuries.

Communications Room

The communications room is located in the dance building in room 3510. Only graduate students and faculty have access to this room by key. Inside is a printer/copier/fax machine that graduate students may use, in addition to the printer/copier located in the Geddes building. There is also a desktop computer in the room that graduate students may use that is equipped with Final Cut Pro, Photoshop, etc. Some office supplies are kept in this room, as well as the projector cart and projector remote controls for the ceiling-mounted projectors in studios B, C, and D.

Performance Lab

The Performance Lab is a specialist space where dance majors can exercise and rehabilitate. Equipment and instructions are available for specific strength training, cardio, and stretching. All equipment, including foam rollers and yoga blankets, must remain in the Performance Lab and are not to be taken out for any reason. The Performance Lab is a code-protected space with access for Dance majors only. The door code to the Performance Lab is not to be shared with anyone outside of the department. No food or drink, except water, is allowed in the Performance Lab and dirty shoes and boots must be removed before entering the space. Students must complete the following three tasks BEFORE being granted access to the Performance Lab:

Kitchen at Geddes

Graduate students also have access to the kitchen at the Geddes Building. The same rules apply regarding use and cleanliness as at the Dance Building. Students are expected to clean up after themselves. There is a campus phone for on-campus calls only. Students are responsible for items left in the refrigerator; dirty utensils and empty/dirty containers must not be left in the fridge. There are cleaning supplies and cupboards available to maintain kitchen items. The dishwasher will be used for special events only and should NOT be used without permission. Graduate students have access to their own coffee machine and are responsible for purchasing coffee and cleaning up and maintaining all aspects of its use. The Department will provide creamer, sugar and disposable cups.

Resource Room/Library at Geddes

The Resource Room/Library, located on the third floor at the Geddes building, is for faculty and graduate student use only. The room contains important materials such as the Department Archive, MFA theses, and dance-specific books and journals. Students are permitted to use these resources for research related to the thesis and MFA program coursework. Nothing is permitted to leave the Resource Room. Please contact the Department Administrator or Department Technology Coordinator for more information.

Health & Wellness

Please check the Department bulletin boards and Appendix F for more information.

 

Campus Services

Central Campus Recreation Building Facilities

The recreational facilities of the CCRB (adjacent to the Dance Building) are available to all U-M students. Students may use the track, saunas, weight equipment, gymnasium, and pool. Classes in aerobics, individual sports, swimming, lifesaving, and other activities are offered for a modest fee. As noted, squash courts can be reserved and can make for good rehearsal space in a bind, especially for small groups and class planning.

Sweetland Center for Writing

Sweetland offers two ways for students to get face-to-face writing help: the Peer Writing Center and its satellite locations and the Writing Workshop. These services allow the student to meet one-on-one with an experienced peer or faculty consultant at any stage of writing, from getting started to final revisions. To get a sense of what to expect, read the Sweetland guidelines before attending a Peer Writing Center or Writing Workshop consultation. For more information, contact: sweetlandinfo@umich.edu.

EXCEL

The School of Music, Theatre & Dance’s EXCEL Program provides entrepreneurship training and career services for all U-M students engaged in the performing arts. Our goal is to enable all of our students to forge a viable career in the performing arts by exploring, developing and leveraging their talents, training, skills, and ambitions. Excellence in Entrepreneurship, Career Empowerment & Leadership (EXCEL) catalyzes success for U-M SMTD students and alumni through courses, co-curricular workshops, ongoing mentoring, and $100,000 in student project and venture funding. For more information, visit: http://www.music.umich.edu/current_students/excel/.

Jonathan Kuuskoski holds EXCEL office hours in the dance building on a regular, weekly basis so students can drop in with questions, issues, or to ask for assistance.

The Career Center

The Career Center, with resources for all U-M students, inspires and supports students to transition confidently beyond the University of Michigan by creating a dynamic space to gain clarity through their process of self-discovery. Visit the Career Center website.

M-Compass, International Study Opportuities

M-Compass is the University of Michigan’s campus-wide gateway for engaged learning opportunities on-campus, in nearby communities, across the United States, and abroad. International opportunities include study, internships, projects, volunteering and research opportunities outside the United States. Through M-Compass, the School of Music, Theatre & Dance offers study exchanges currently in Paris, Freiberg, and Helsinki. M-Compass website. Paola Savvidou is the Global Engagement Advisor for SMTD. Contact her at savvidou@umich.edu.

Center for Global and Intercultural Study (CGIS)

The Center for Global and Intercultural Study (CGIS) provides global learning opportunities to the University of Michigan community. U-M students in all schools and colleges are welcome to apply. Most UM-awarded financial aid may be used toward program costs. CGIS offers four programs: Michigan Global Academic Programs, Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates, Spring/Summer Language Study, and Global Course Connections. The U-M Center for Global and Intercultural Study (CGIS) is located at Suite 200, Weiser Hall, 500 Church St., (734)764-4311, cgis@umich.edu.

Counseling & Psychological Services

CAPS offers a variety of services aimed at helping students resolve personal difficulties and acquire the skills, attitudes, and knowledge that will enable them to take full advantage of their experiences at the University of Michigan. Emily Hyssong (emhyss@umich.edu) is the CAPS Counselor for SMTD located at 1275 Moore building on North Campus. Students may also request CAPS counseling on Central Campus on the 3rd floor of the Michigan Union (Rm. 3100). Access online or call (734) 764-8312.

Nutrition Clinic

Students can make an appointment with a registered dietician at theUHS’s Nutrition Clinic at (734) 764-8320 or call the clinic for information at(734) 763-3760. Their services are free of charge and they provide expertise on a variety of nutrition and food-related issues. https://www.uhs.umich.edu/nutritionclinic.

M-Perform Performance Arts Therapy

M-Perform is a specialty program designed to address the unique needs and problems of the Performing Artist. Physician and Therapy Teams in PT, OT and Hand Therapy have many years of experience in Orthopedics, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine. Whether a musician, dancer, conductor or pianist, M-Perform can help rehabilitate the artist and work to prevent future injuries. Call for an appointment at (734) 936-7175 or 998-7888 for physical therapy. Be sure to check on insurance coverage and specify that the call is an 'arts med' referral.

MedSport

University Medical Center Sports Medicine Program (MedSport) is located at Domino’s Farms (4029 Ave Maria Drive, Lobby A, Suite 1000, Ann Arbor, MI 48106), which includes orthopedic doctors, physical therapists, and athletic trainers experienced in performing arts-related injuries. Please contact MedSport to request information regarding this clinic at (734) 930-7400. Kristen Schuyten is our main point of contact there: kbalfour@med.umich.edu.

Transportation

If rehearsing in the building or theatres after dark, it is not safe to travel alone. Students have several transportation options including:

  • Night Ride. Shared-ride taxi service within Ann Arbor (when regularly scheduled AAATA bus service is not available) seven days a week, Monday through Friday, 11:00PM to 6:00AM and Saturday and Sunday, 7:00PM to 7:30AM. Fee is $5 per person. Also available on all major holidays. Phone (734) 647-8000, select option #3.
  • Ride Home. Free shared-ride taxi service for students, faculty, and staff to their residence halls, vehicles parked in U-M operated lots or structures, or local residence (within a one-mile radius of Central and North Campuses). This service is available after University transit buses and shuttles have concluded daily service: from 2:00AM through 7:00AM, seven days a week. Please note: students and faculty must show the driver a valid UM ID. Phone (734) 647-8000, select option #2.
  • SafeRide. A campus accompaniment service that functions as an alternative to walking alone on campus at night. Coordinated by staff at the Division of Public Safety & Security (DPSS), SafeRide is a free service that transports students, faculty, and staff to their residence or vehicle within a one-mile radius of campus. Riders may use this service once per evening and must present a valid U-M ID (Mcard). During Fall and Winter terms, this service is available daily from 8:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m. Just call (734) 647-8000 and select option #1. An employee from U-M Transportation Services will come to the student’s campus location and drive them to their requested location (within a one-mile driving radius of Central and North campuses). During non-service hours, alternative service providers may be identified by UMPD.

University Health Service

University Health Services (UHS) can provide most of a student’s health care while they are at the University. Students pay a health service fee (included as part of tuition) which covers many services. For who and what is covered, see Free or Fees for Students. UHS is located on 207 Fletcher St. and they provide medical services for all UM students and staff on a walk-in or appointment basis. UHS is open weekdays until 4:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings. Call (734) 764-8320 to schedule an appointment or to talk about a health concern. Physical therapy is provided if deemed necessary by a Health Services doctor.

U-Move Fitness

Located in the CCRB, U-Move Fitness offers a wide variety of group exercise (Pilates, Yoga, Cardio) and wellness classes to faculty, staff, and students of the University of Michigan and residents of Ann Arbor and surrounding communities. Schedule and class descriptions.

 

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Photography Credits:

U-M Photo Services

Joe Welsh

Peter Smith

David Smith

Glen Behring

Tom Bower

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