Menu

News

Faculty Spotlight – David Jackson

Professor David Jackson with the University of Michigan Trombone Ensemble in concert

Professor David Jackson with the University of Michigan Trombone Ensemble, which he directs.

Professor of Trombone David Jackson (MM ’92, BM ’91, trombone) enjoys an active career as a performer and teacher. He is a recognized and ardent supporter of new music who has commissioned and premiered numerous compositions for the trombone. He spends his summers teaching and performing at the Brevard Music Center. Mr. Jackson is an S. E. Shires artist and clinician.

Tell us about your artistic journey
I grew up in a very musical family. My mother played the trombone in high school and my father played the trumpet and taught high school and middle school band. I was attending band concerts for as long as I can remember. At the age of 12, my father asked me to choose an instrument to begin. I said “Drums!” before he could even finish the question. He gently steered me toward the family of wind instruments by listing them one by one. When he got to the trombone, I remembered the action of the slide and the way it always reflected the stage lighting at his band concerts. This appealed to my “hyperactive” nature and a match was made.

I suspect that his steering me away from the “drums” had something to do with the fact that houses in Texas don’t have basements…

In any case, I’ve had no regrets. My father was my first teacher.

What inspires you as a performer/collaborator?
As performing musicians, we are inspired by the need to express. Whether this comes from a need to express ideas of social issues, personal feelings, or observations of the world around us, expression is what drives the creative process.

What is special about Michigan?
Our Michigan students possess a wonderful combination of creativity, musicianship, and intellect that drives their passion for excellence.

Do you feel that there are any positive changes brought about by the pandemic?
This pandemic has allowed many of us to reflect on those things that matter most to us. I hope that we can maintain that sense of awareness as things become busier.